That Would be Junk Food”

“40 Ways to Leave Your Lover: That Would Be Junk Food” Book Cover

As a certified nutritionist and wellness coach, I’ve helped dozens of people change their whole mind-set about food, with the result being they lose anywhere from five to 50 pounds–and keep it off.

In the beginning, it’s bliss. Your love object provides everything you need at just the moment you need it. You couldn’t be happier…until it all starts going terribly wrong. Those ecstatic highs are soon followed by crashing lows. You gain weight. You begin to hate yourself. You know you have to get out of this relationship—but how?

“Be a little bad,” advises Lorie Eber. “And add more trips to the bathroom.” Unorthodox relationship advice? Not when the love of your life is junk food.

These and 38 other bite-sized, practical, relatable, humor-laced tips come from leading Orange County, CA–based wellness coach and author Lorie Eber in her new book, “40 Ways to Leave Your Lover: That Would be Junk Food” ($9.99 on Amazon).

“In our food-centric society, we turn to food to meet all of our emotional needs,” says Eber, a former corporate litigator turned Mayo Clinic certified wellness coach and certified nutritionist. “It’s not much of a stretch to call junk food a ‘lover.’ But this is a lover we want to leave.”

The book, written in Eber’s signature down-to-earth, tough-love (but good-humored!) style, offers simple, relatable and straightforward ways to get weight off and keep excess pounds at bay without depriving yourself. Better yet, the book can help anyone develop a positive relationship with food while maintaining a healthy weight.

“As a certified nutritionist and wellness coach, I’ve helped dozens of people change their whole mindset about food, with the result being that they lose anywhere from five to 50 pounds—and keep it off,” says Eber. “Now, I’d like to share my secret weapons with readers who are serious about losing weight and living a healthy lifestyle. They will be surprised at how attainable their goals really are.”

So what does “Be a little bad” mean? For one thing, it means avoiding anything that smacks of dieting. “Never go into ‘diet-mode,’” Eber says. “Imposing a lifetime ban on your go-to junk food favorites will backfire. Give yourself permission to be a little bad now and then.” Eber herself subscribes to the everyday-friendly Mediterranean style of eating, which is based on typical foods like fruits, vegetables, fish, and whole grains.

Eber also advises readers and clients to “Buy frozen,” referring to the times when you “go to the farmer’s market and over-buy with the best intentions. You stock your fridge with healthy food that rots. Be a realist and buy…

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