Review: Pathos Times Two: A Double Dose of Inge, in Close Quarters

Photo

Ginna Le Vine and David T. Patterson in William Inge’s “Picnic,” at the Gym at Judson.

Credit
Richard Termine for The New York Times

Hal and Marie are young, gorgeous, vital. They’re also inopportune outsiders, wreaking havoc on seemingly tranquil communities.

As the catalysts in two William Inge plays of the 1950s, Hal (in “Picnic”) and Marie (in “Come Back, Little Sheba”) are inadvertent agents of change. But don’t expect melodramatic fireworks: The shows depict lives in turmoil with deceptive simplicity — an elusive quality that the Transport Group captures in the graceful revivals now in repertory at the Gym at Judson.

Inge doesn’t have the reputation of his contemporary Tennessee Williams, perhaps because he lacked Williams’s incantatory flamboyance, which encouraged myriad staging possibilities, audience devotion and a thousand campy spoofs. But his work burst with generous humanity and possessed a sure grasp on the power of intimacy — something these productions skillfully bring to the fore.

Video

Excerpt: ‘Come Back, Little Sheba’

A scene from the Transport Group’s revival of the William Inge play.


By TRANSPORT GROUP on Publish Date March 26, 2017.


.

The director Jack Cummings III has staged both shows in close quarters for about 85 people at a time. The Kansas porches where the “Picnic” action takes place are gone, and Dane Laffrey’s scenic design consists of a few rusting deck chairs in front of a plywood back wall. There is period furniture in “Sheba,” which only reinforces the play’s take on claustrophobic…

Read the full article from the Source…

Back to Top