Monitoring the Formation and Removal of Biofilms From Clinically…

A large percentage of bacterial species are capable of growing on biotic and abiotic surfaces. Within these surfaced-adhered communities secreted signaling molecules are used to coordinate gene expression across the entire colony, thereby promoting survival. An adaptation commonly found within these colonies is the production of biofilm, a secreted extracellular polymeric matrix that can be comprised of polysaccharides, nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, and/or teichoic acids. This extracellular matrix increases bacterial virulence by acting as a physical barrier that both occludes antibiotic molecules and helps the bacteria to evade detection by immune cells. Bacterial biofilms are of great importance to human health, causing dental…

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