Husky crews set Montlake Cut course records in Windemere Cup wins

The men’s winning time broke a 20-year-old course record set by Washington in the 1997 Cal dual regatta of 5:30.0. The women’s performance broke the 30-year-old record set by the Soviet Union national team in the 1987 Windermere Cup of 6:11.73.

Sprinting down the Montlake Cut course as if they had motors instead of oars, University of Washington men’s and women’s varsity crews set course records Saturday in winning Windermere Cup feature races.

The Husky men covered the 2,000-meter course in 5 minutes, 27.48 seconds, finishing far ahead of the Shanghai, China men’s team that was clocked in 5:45.36.

The UW women won in 6:07.03. The Huskies’ second varsity eight was runner-up in 6:18.12 and the Shanghai visitors were third in 6:37.23.

The course that starts on Lake Washington then enters the Montlake Cut has been used by UW rowing teams since the 1970s.

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The men’s winning time broke a 20-year-old course record set by Washington in the 1997 Cal dual regatta of 5:30.0. The women’s performance broke the 30-year-old record set by the Soviet Union national team in the 1987 Windermere Cup of 6:11.73.

The impressive performances come two weeks after both UW varsity boats lost to archrival California on the Montlake Cut. The Huskies get a chance for revenge next weekend at the Pac-12 championships on Lake Natoma outside Sacramento and then will see the Bears again at national championship regattas.

The UW crews benefited from a huge partisan crowd on hand for the Seattle spectacle of the Windermere Cup Regatta followed by the annual yacht parade to herald the opening of boating season.

Men’s coxswain Stuart Sim said the perfect racing conditions of a cool temperature (low 50s) and negligible wind combined with the enthusiastic crowd as factors in the victory.

“The crowd certainly got us through the last 500 (meters),” he said. “It was the crowd that…

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