How the GOP health care plan differs from Obamacare

The House voted today 217-213 in favor of the American Health Care Act. How does the Republican health care plan differ from Obamacare?

Here is a breakdown of the AHCA:

In brief: What the AHCA does

  • Ends individual mandate, imposes surcharge for coverage lapse
  • Ends Obamacare premium subsidies, offers tax credits instead
  • Rolls back Medicaid expansion across 30 states
  • Allows states to impose Medicaid work requirement
  • Expands health savings accounts
  • Allows states to waive federal “essential health benefits” requirement and set own standard
  • Allows insurers to charge older people up to 5 times as much as younger
  • Repeals consumer taxes
  • Imposes abortion restriction on tax credits
  • Imposes Planned Parenthood restriction for Medicaid
  • Requires insurers to allow young adults to stay on parents’ plans until 26
  • Allows states to permit insurers to charge more for pre-existing conditions
  • Allocates $8 billion to help subsidize people with pre-existing conditions in state high-risk pools
  • Prohibits insurers from imposing lifetime or annual limits on coverage
  • Establishes “patient and state stability fund” to help states service low-income Americans
  • Ends individual mandate, imposes surcharge for coverage lapse

    The AHCA would rescind the federal mandate that all Americans have health insurance or pay a penalty on their taxes. This would allow people to choose not to purchase coverage if they so desire; the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) projects thousands of Americans will make that choice. One possible consequence of ending the mandate: fewer healthy people will be part of the insurance pool, meaning higher prices and premiums for others. To incentivize coverage, the bill would allow insurers to charge a 30 percent penalty on anyone seeking an insurance policy after going a period without it.

    Ends Obamacare premium subsidies, offers tax credits instead

    The House GOP bill would provide tax credits between $2,000 and $14,000 a year for individuals who don’t get…

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